Empowered by Replication

©KAR

©KAR

During my tenure at Lucent Technologies (now Alcatel-Lucent), I was taught how to replicate myself for the greater good of the corporation. The process was fairly easy to learn, but it took a bold move of overcoming my fears to live the concept out loud. Those who were given the same opportunity and chose not to engage the process, found their corporate trajectory limited.

The concept of replication is simple: Reproduce your most profitable corporate skills within an equal or lower level associate in order to work yourself out of a job.

Work myself out of a job! Are you nuts!

The concept alone makes it clear why inner fears must be subdued in order to achieve success, especially during a time that no longer rewards loyalty. But restraining inner conflict isn’t half as important as figuring out how to replicate your skills in a way that equals or surpasses your current abilities – Generating greater value for the corporation.

During my experimental stages of replication, I learned that all workers are capable of replicating themselves in co-workers, which demonstrates an ability that becomes more valuable the higher he or she rises within the corporation.

I also learned: Everyone can empower themselves by replicating their abilities in others by following five steps.

1. DETERMINE THE SKILL THAT IMPACTS THE P&L

Understanding the direct correlation of your executable skills to the bottom line is essential to the replication process. In the case where access to the information is limited, understanding what your boss’s and his boss’s bonus is based on can suffice. Whether strategic or tactical, everyone has at least one skill that is directly related to the desired corporate growth.

In my first year on the network side of the business at Lucent Technologies, I was a Sales Specialist, a title held by a few thousand others (the company had 165,000 employees at the time). One day an executive asked me what I was doing. I had no idea how to answer, so he asked a high level manager to interview me and help me break my skills and process down. It was then that I realized my choices had directly impacted the bottom line and the executive wanted to replicate my skills to everyone carrying the same title. It was the first time I understood the power of replication.

2. DETERMINE THE PROCESS THAT FACILITATES THE SKILL

Analyzing and breaking the skill down into its basic steps is critical to the formation of an educational or replication plan. All skills can be broken down into easily managed and learnable elements. This process helps the mastery of the information at an accelerated rate.

I was hired by the new enterprise division at Motorola to sell wireless switches to campus-based businesses. My goal was to sell more than anyone else, even though I didn’t know how many had been sold. After closing my first switch sale, I was hit with a barrage of questions. The vice president wanted to know what I did and revealed that I was the first sales person to close a deal. He immediately shared the process he gleaned from our conversation and every sales person closed deals that year. It was an eye opening experience for me to realize the importance and structure of my process for replication.

3. TEACH THE BENEFITS AND PROCESS THAT DEVELOP THE SKILL

Co-workers require an understanding of the personal benefits gained by having a skill specific mentor, especially when it means more responsibility without a promise of additional pay. The benefits must be tied directly to the skill and not be filled with elusive fluff.

The benefits must also be tied to each process step to validate the process. If a benefit isn’t associated with a step, reconsider the necessity of that step. The why, behind each process step, causes the trainee to take responsibility for developing that portion of the needed skill set.

4. EMPOWER CO-WORKER WITH MORE RESPONSIBILITY

Practice develops confidence in using new skill sets and is best facilitated by affirmation and suggestions that keep the trainee within the parameters of the project scope. The ideal way of creating a safe place for training is to allow the co-worker to fail without fault. As a mentor, minor adjustments can be suggested to help alter the course of failure to that of success.

I received my Six Sigma green belt during my time at Motorola. The training process gave me responsibility for reducing expenses of a key product by $2MM. My black belt mentor guided my process and taught me how to think logically and structurally. He gave me full responsibility for the project and bragged about me to all the right people. While I didn’t receive a dime for my efforts, I did gain a significant amount of respect, which kept me alive during lay-offs. And, it was fun to learn that several people received bonuses as a direct result of my actions.

5. PROMOTE THE P&L RESULTS BASED ON THE NEW REPLICATION SYSTEM

Executives love to hear elevator pitches about how a newly implemented replication process directly impacts the P&L and their bonus. By bragging on the co-worker’s success, it becomes evident how they achieved their goal and the person behind the curtain. Not only does the executive learn about the co-workers new talents and how it improves his team, but he also understands who is behind the team’s growth – A far more valuable employee because of his ability to replicate success.

During my time at Home Depot, I had the opportunity to replicate some of my skills in one of my team members who longed for my position. We took time every week for a couple of months to bring him up to speed with the most important skills. When it came time for my move to another department, I was able to brag about his growth and accomplishments. The man I mentored quickly filled the job that normally took months to fill.

By giving away our skills, we can watch doors of opportunity open our future. With each open door, we work hard to develop our next set of skills and soon find ways of replicating it in time for our next level of success. After all, who better to be put in charge of all these growing skill leaders than the one who facilitated their growth.

Copyright © 2015 by CJ Powers

97 Films Recommended by The Church of Satan

Good vs. EvilI’ve written about Christian films in recent days due to the surge in religious films. Some of the films are great redemptive stories for the general market, while others are preachy and intended for the like minded. In both cases, the genre has been difficult to define by production companies and distributors.

Another type of film is also getting attention and it too is hard to capture within a defined genre. Some refer to the films as satanic, while others suggest it is atheistic. In reality, it’s a genre that is more based in “I-theism.” In other words, pictures about a main character that is his own “god” – A person that establishes his own subjective hierarchy with himself as the most valued.

The films might also reflect the strong satanic beliefs followed like:

  • All forms of emotions from love to hate are healthy.
  • Ritual is for self-psychotherapy to purge any sense of conscience or emotion that hinders intelligently moderated pursuit of pleasures.
  • The prime dictate in lifestyle indulgence, over compulsion.
  • Animalistic tendencies and concern for the ecosystem.
  • All forms of sexuality between consenting adults.
  • Societal laws that regulate behavior so that a maximum of freedom might be obtained.
  • Justice where the punishment fits the crime when working to maintain an equitable society.

BladerunnerWhile some of this content sounds fine, like justice fitting the crime, it’s the intent and overarching goal that is self-centered. The purpose of the philosophy is to help individuals take their place, as god in their own lives, which is what Satanism is all about. That’s right, for most followers, it’s not about worshiping the devil, but self.

The list of films is one that Magus Anton Szandor LaVey felt best guided a viewer toward Satanism. While most of the filmmakers didn’t know they were leading their audience down a religious path, some were purposeful in their intent.

There was no surprise reading some films from the list like Rosemary’s Baby, Bedazzled and Svengali. Each of those films had overt satanic elements. However, some films were more of a surprise including classics like Citizen Kane, Metroplois, and Fantasia. Even more shocking was the family friendly film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.

The List of Films is NOT to be FearedWhen it comes to films like All the King’s Men, Bladerunner, The Comic, Pennies From Heaven, The Private Files of J. Edgar Hoover, Scarface (the original), The Stepford Wives, and Westworld, I can understand how the elements appreciated by the cult can be gleaned from the films, but that doesn’t make the film itself a satanic film.

Depicting a characteristic or a human flaw doesn’t make a film satanic, for it’s how the element is demonstrated that determines how it is received. For instance, a film about a wretched sinner that is later redeemed doesn’t make a film satanic, yet it might get the title onto the list.

Intent and performance determines if the content is redeemable or not. A selfish character may make the list, but if the film depicts a realistic cause and effect of his life, followed by a redemptive outcome, the film does more for the soul than a story steeped in teachings that convince audiences to put themselves above others – Looking out for number one.

The bottom line is that the list of 97 films is not to be feared or avoided, as some would conclude, but can bring an awareness of perspective.

A film like Les Misérables depicted a character that may have made a more recent list. But the story’s realistically portrayed redemptive qualities were far more powerful, putting the character’s original life choices in perspective with love, humility and gracious generosity that overcomes all. There has never been a better movie depicting the redemptive qualities of grace and mercy. Yet, some avoided the film for fear that their character would be negatively affected.

Redemptive stories will always overcome self-centered stories. Call it good versus evil, or God versus Satan, if you will. But, most of the highest grossing films of all time are stories of redemption. And, most satanic films do poorly at the box office.

What’s your view? Can a filmmaker unknowingly make a Satanic film?

Copyright © 2914 by CJ Powers