Podcast: Exploration Ice Cream

I’ve been busy speaking on The Creative You podcast over the past handful of weeks. My recent speaking engagements have also been on the topic of creativity. Many that heard my recent talks have requested that I publish new posts to my blog on things a person can do to grow or expand their creativity.

Today, I’ve decided to respond with a technique designed to remove the ruts of our thinking patterns while brainstorming perspectives not yet considered. Instead of spending time writing out the technique, I’ve decided to share a podcast. I chatted with my host, Rebecca Boskovic, about the process of how to remove the ruts of repetitive thinking and how to practice the “Ice Cream” method.

To listen to the free episode, click here or go to https://www.patreon.com/cjpowers

As you listen to this episode, put yourself in Rebecca’s shoes as she walks through the process. Then you’ll be able to try the technique on your own using your real-world situation. And, if you like this episode and are interested in hearing other episodes, you can subscribe on that same page for a small fee of $4.00 (the cost of a cup of coffee) for four, half-hour episodes every month. Enjoy this free episode.

 

Advertisements

Become a Trouble-Shooting Hero at Work

Creativity

Think about the place where you work and that one guy who always seems to come to the rescue with the latest problem-solving idea. You know the guy that I’m talking about. The one who your boss, after hours of worrying himself and making the team sick with concern, brags about his hero and takes him out for ice cream after he saves the day, again.

Have you ever wanted to be that guy?

Have you ever wanted the boss to recognize you for saving the team’s life like he does with that guy?

Well, I finally sat down with that guy and asked him how he consistently pulled off miracles for the boss. After taking copious notes, I’m sharing his process today. Here are the three ideas worth embracing to become a future hero in your boss’ eyes.

DEVELOP CREATIVE THINKING SKILLS

Everyone is creative, but few practice and hone their creativity. How do I know this? First, I can see it, because it’s physical. The left side of the brain processes logic and the right side, creativity. Since most everyone was born with both sides of their brain, they have the elements necessary for creative thought. Unfortunately, the school system teaches logic and sometimes frowns on the creative.

I’ll never forget the instruction I was given on the day we colored our first art project in kindergarten. The teacher gave us numerous rules to follow, which greatly limited my perspective. She told us the sky was blue and the grass was green. She even held up each of the crayons that she thought we should use to color the sky and grass.

This limited perspective stopped us from coloring an orange or purple sunset. It stopped me from mixing colors in an attempt to find the right version of green to match the different colors of grass that I saw in Illinois, Kentucky, Colorado, and Florida. It also stopped us from using a combination of three different green crayons to show the subtleties of grass in the shade and the bright sun.

Individuals who excelled at school developed the left side of their brain far more than their right side. Most of them received great accolades for their achievements, but they also received a negative seed that may have festered in their life over the years. That seed possibly grew into a belief that they were not creative.

A businesswoman recently shared how she sent her kids to the best schools so they could have a well-rounded mindset when they entered the job market. When I queried her on what she did to train her kids in creative thinking, she shared how she left play time up to the kids.

I asked what kind of a surgeon her son might be if she had him trained in the arts and left the development of medical knowledge to himself. She laughed and told me how silly I was for suggesting that someone could train themselves in surgery. I chuckled and suggested how silly it was to think her kids could train themselves in creative thinking, troubleshooting, and innovation.

If we want to be our business’ next problem-solving hero, we must intentionally develop our creativity. The more help we get from creativity gurus, the greater our opportunity to thrive creatively. For weekly opportunities to develop creativity, I recommend subscribing to my podcast, THE CREATIVE YOU, where everyone grows creatively. Every episode provides instruction and life application for work, home, and community. Learn more about the podcast or subscribe by clicking here.

LEARN THAT ALL IDEAS ARE WORTH BUILDING ON

Trouble-shooting discussions or brainstorming meetings require one functioning rule to be in place. The simple rule is that participants are not allowed to say anything negative or bad about an idea that’s put on the table for discussion. I get asked all too often why someone can’t point out that an idea was a really bad one.

Here are just a few of the things that happen when negative comments are made:

  1. Everyone becomes more hesitant to risk offering a suggestion.
  2. The focus shifts from a solution orientation to everything that won’t work.
  3. The condemned idea can no longer be used as a jumping off point to the solution.
  4. The positive energy and hope in the room turn to futility.

When participants share the mindset that all answers are good and we continue to look for the next best idea, everyone finds a way that they can improve upon the latest great idea.

Reading biographies of inventors from days gone by, I couldn’t help but realize that some of the brainstormed ideas that appeared foolish, were perfectly placed to reset the inventor’s mindset, leading him or her to something that they would never have considered, which led to their breakthrough. In other words, the “bad” idea was necessary to find the best idea.

During my creative coaching sessions, I teach students to think, “yes, and…” This mindset forces them to add to what has been presented and avoid taking away from any previous idea. The practice also makes the room a safe place for sharing ideas that might be on the edge of sanity like the original concept of creating an electric lightbulb.

GAIN CONFIDENCE IN YOUR CREATIVE ABILITIES

Creativity is a process that requires practice. The more hours a person puts into developing their creative skills, the more proficient they become. Also, the more a person plays with the mixing of concrete and intangible ideas, the easier the person will be able to create useful ideas and solutions in the workplace. The good news is that creativity can be developed and practiced in the mind as well as in the person’s physical surroundings.

One form of practicing creativity for real-world use includes the assessment of repetitive events that need to change. Since we know the cause of the problem, we are able to think about it in advance of when circumstances would typically play out, giving us time to change our actions in a way that impacts the natural outcome or scenario faced. Being armed ahead of time with a potential solution builds confidence.

Family events make a perfect example. Let’s say that food is always a part of family parties and Uncle Harry experiences gas issues after eating apple pie. And of course, Aunt Mabel always brings her famous apple pie. Since we know this will happen, we can practice our creativity by thinking through scenarios that could be instigated to make sure Uncle Harry gets a different dessert or Aunt Mabel is inspired to try making a blueberry pie—or a French Silk pie.

By creating a list of plausible cause and effect scenarios to accommodate a new outcome, there’s a far better possibility that the family would support an idea that ensures no gas is passed at the next party. Taking time to creatively plan ahead for a meeting or family event, we are able to build confidence with our plausible solutions and shine like a hero when the time is right. This type of practice will raise our confidence level because we’ll be prepared for the event.

Based on the above three points, it’s clear that creativity is not artistry.

Yes, artistry can take advantage of creativity, but creativity is not artistry. Creativity is a unique method of problem-solving that generates some form of innovation as a solution.

If the innovation is a product or marketable service, it might require a level of artistry for its promotion or packaging. However, creativity in of itself is not artistry, and once most people understand the distinctive difference, they are more likely to practice and grow their confidence in their newly developed creative skills.

© 2019 by CJ Powers
 Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

The Christmas Truce of 1914

Christmas_Truce_1914.jpgA bullet split through the frozen ground and ricocheted into the trench. The British soldiers shifted position, their feet stirred the sloppy straw-laced mud as they found their footing to return fire. None of the World War I soldiers wanted to spend their Christmas Eve dodging bullets. They preferred thinking about their loved ones back home and the traditional celebrations handed down through previous generations.

Lifting binoculars to his eyes, Captain Sir Edward Hulse kept a keen eye on the Germans. The 350-400 yard no-man’s-land between the British and German trenches reduced the number of casualties and made any form of pursuit suicidal. Captain Hulse knew the battle would be drawn out and slip into Christmas Day.

When the British soldiers stood for arms at six o’clock that prominent morning, the number of shots taken were greatly reduced from the previous day. By eight o’clock, only a few scattered, single shots could be heard off to the side where the border patrol stood watch. The main fighting zone held a natural truce that was neither dictated by the British or the Germans. The eye’s of the soldiers reflected a sense of peace that morning, allowing each one to ponder gratitude for the good within the lives of their families.

Germans Extend Grace

Captain Hulse was startled by movement out of the corner of his eye. He lifted the binoculars and spied four Germans who had climbed out of their trenches and headed toward the British.  None carried weapons. He watched as they slowed to a stop in the middle of no-mans-land, making sure not to cross into British territory.

Captain Hulse wondered what message they might have carried and quickly ordered two men to meet the Germans in the middle unarmed. None wanted to take such a risk on Christmas, forcing Captain Hulse to climb out of the trench and traverse the frozen ground alone. The walk felt longer than it was, knowing that 100,000 or so men from both sides were watching every step he took.

The Captain was greeted by three privates and a stretcher bearer. One German shared how they felt compelled to wish the Captain and his men a happy Christmas. The four Germans had put their lives on the line, trusting the British to keep the unstated truce. The German spokesperson shared that the men personally had no feeling of enmity against the British, but they were soldiers who had to obey their superiors.

The conversation became complex as the Captain and soldiers discussed the terrible wounds made by the rifle bullets. They all agreed that the high-velocity bullets with a pointed nose were designed to inflict wounds at short range. They also agreed that the old South African round nosed bullets made a cleaner hole. The conversation continued for a half hour, at which time a German, who saw great similarities between men, suggested that both sides return unarmed in the afternoon to the no-mans-land to celebrate Christmas.

Christmas Party for All

Later in the afternoon, a large group of unarmed Germans entered no-man’s-land. One of the German snipers led his fellow soldiers in the singing of Christmas carols, while they watched the unarmed British move toward them. Soon they sang a chorus or two of O Tannenbaum and the British joined in with the English translation of O Christmas Tree. The men marveled at their unified ability to sing the same song with different words. Laughter and handshakes followed.

The party lasted a couple hours and many exchanged gifts, based on what they had on them at the time. Some exchanged pipe tobacco, cigarettes, pens, pins, alcohol, and other small paraphernalia. Everyone had a merry time.

A 19-year-old private named Henry William Williams smoked a pipe during the party that was given to him by Princess Mary. In the pipe was German tobacco gifted to him from one of the enemy soldiers. They had met after a joyous chorus, shook hands and exchanged gifts or souvenir trinkets. Both gifts were heartily received.

When the day grew short, Captain Hulse ordered his men back to the trenches.

An Extended Truce

The Germans promised that they would maintain the truce indefinitely. Captain Hulse said that the truce had ended, but the Germans persisted that they would not continue the fight unless the British fired first. The Captain clarified the end of the truce and continued walking back to the trenches. A short time later a few British soldiers took plum pudding to the Germans, received thanks, and returned to their trenches. Not a single shot was fired for the rest of the evening. Neither side wanted to fire on the men that they had met personally.

The night watch hours were also silent. Not a single weapon was raised against the opponent. The men were comfortable in the aura of peace that had befallen all soldiers. Several men wrote letters to their mothers during the still of the night, speaking highly of the men they had met and the miracle truce that transpired. Those writing letters never fathomed how their letters, years later, would testify to the Christmas miracle—thanks to World War I historians that documented the war efforts.

Not a single man was willing to break the miraculous gift of the truce that surpassed their understanding. They embraced the silent night with thankfulness in their hearts.

Relieved

Quietness filled the wore-torn battlefield late into the evening. The Grenadiers arrived and relieved the British soldiers. By first light, the Grenadiers stood and fired upon the Germans. A new battle had broken out and thousands of lives were lost. But the miracle story of the truce was remembered and retold every year by those who understood the power of Christmas and the joy of those who participate.

Copyright 2018 by CJ Powers

If you’d like to support my blog writing, please consider buying me a proverbial cup of coffee by clicking the button below.

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Three Creative Journals Worth Exploring

I recently received three journals from the Ellie Claire imprint and was very impressed by the quality of the books. Not only do the books lay flat for the writer, but they use a very high grade of paper for those of us who like to sketch with ink. I even used watercolor markers without worrying about bleed through on a subsequent page.

fc3755_8ed06bba0d37467e94c4bd607ce3b518_mv2The Illuminate Your Story Journal had quotes and scriptures salted throughout the book. After every couple of writing pages, the book instructs the writer with how to create illuminated letters used in ancient times. The steps were easy to follow and helped me build my bullet journal lettering vocabulary of styles and fonts. Based on the book and my new abilities, the art of illumination is certainly not lost today, as I once thought.

The hard cover was designed to last a lifetime and is rugged enough to survive more drops than I’d make. The texture and embossing of the book are also of a high quality, making you feel like you own something worthy of your words. The artistic value is amazing and the elastic band to hold the book closed helps protect the pages when the book takes a tumble. The book also has a place saving ribbon and a pocket for collected ideas in the back.

IMG_6799

fc3755_0695f523a03a4f5fabd6f848fdb42986_mv2The Faith and Lettering book is a little larger in size and offers lessons on typography. It only took me a few minutes to understand one of the designs and immediately start using it in my daily business notes. The book also gives professional tips on how to draw flourishes, arrows, and banners.

One of the most fun aspects of the book is the training pages that encompass line art, a graphic, banner, and a mixture of type fonts using a decorative verse. The page shows the final work, provides a lightly traceable version for practice, and gives enough space for a couple efforts of your own.

Not only did I have fun practicing the various styles combined with imagery, but I found myself having memorized the verse just from the writing process. I also had the imagery of it ingrained in my brain so I could review it in my mind’s eye whenever I chose. Prior to doodling in this journal, I had no idea how quickly memorization could happen as a result of this artistic process.

fc3755_92690eef39404e29ac5d755c19f85c77_mv2The Illustrated Word was the third book I reviewed. It took me back in time to the art of the Renaissance. This coloring journal had numerous illustrations ready for my choice colors. It also had a fully colored segment on the opposite page to see what the artist thought to use as an appropriate color palette.

The book had far more pages for writing than the other books and included a full-color illustration on every spread from the Museum of the Bible archives. The artistry illustrated from hundreds of years ago was amazing, and the intricate handwritten words brought an understanding of the importance of words to bear.

All three books were masterfully crafted and raised my interest in the Ellie Claire imprint. I went to EllieClaire.com to see the hundred plus additional artistic products, most of which are worth far more than its price tag.

So, check out the three new journals and let me know how much you enjoy them.

Copyright 2018 by CJ Powers
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in hopes that I would mention it on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

The Remnant has Launched

There is a small group of “believers” who are pouring their lives into the secular marketplace. The impact of the group is growing, and while the general public are embracing their message of hope, others who defend the “Evangelical lifestyle” over all else are attacking the remnant.

Lauren Daigle has a clear vision to reach those “outside of the church walls.” Her recent appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show and Jimmy Fallon was well received by the general public, but those who are trying to keep the Evangelical lifestyle alive (I’ll refer to them as the ELAs) warned the “church” that her secular venues might lead her astray, causing Daigle to abandon her worship roots to become a secular artist.

The odd thing is that Daigle is a Contemporary Christian Artist through and through. Her latest album “Look Up Child” reached #3 on Billboards Top 200 because its message was universal and appealed to the masses. Unfortunately, Daigle’s performance on NBC received criticism on social media. Most argued that Daigle was wrong to appear on the show because Ellen is a lesbian.

Daigle responded to some of the criticism during an interview on WAY-FM Radio, “I think the second we start drawing lines around which people are able to be approached and which aren’t, we’ve already completely missed the heart of God.”

Jeremy Lynch appears to be another member of this up and coming remnant. His passion is making movies that reach the general public with messages of hope and love. Lynch is a Millennial filmmaker who got his start working crew for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. After getting his feet wet, he became an editor and worked on the visual effects for The Ryan Car Show. Most recently he wrote, directed, and produced his first short film The Scavenger, which can be seen on Amazon Prime Video. The Scavenger is a story of transformational love that changes a selfish man into a self-sacrificing man—a clear demonstration of unconditional love.

Lynch is not immune to ELA attacks, but has far less to worry about since his passion has always been focused on the general marketplace. Most ELAs have a penchant for going after those well established in the “Kingdom” because of what some call a “we/they” mentality. While the Bible directs Christians to “go” into the marketplace, ELAs believe Christians should “separate” themselves and create their own marketplace, which some see as a contradiction to the “Great Commission.”

While the argument about “separating from the world” versus “being in the world, but not of it” will continue to be argued for years to come, high profile people like Selena Gomez are taking advantage of this new uprising of the remnant.

Selena_GomezGomez has promoted Daigle’s album multiple times on social media to her 144.4 million followers. Daigle’s top three songs have been listened to by millions within the general public, creating one of the greatest witnessing tools of this past decade. Yet, the ELAs are more concerned that Daigle might create less worship songs, rather than rejoice in the millions who have heard her message of hope.

Unity within the church and the supporting of those who go into the marketplace must be revived for denominations to survive these changing times. The question is, will the ELAs empower this revival or will they become modern day Pharisees?

No matter what the outcome, millions will continue to be touched by the remnant.

Copyright © 2018 by CJ Powers

Is The Book Or Film Better?

Book vs. FilmThe number of scripts I receive for consideration or review every year is astounding. Each of the major studios receive about 100 scripts a day and 99% of them are not worth reading. The biggest dilemma I face comes from the author. Most of the scripts I receive are from talented literary authors trying to write a screenplay, which seldom goes well.

The first problem that I typically encounter is the author using detailed and flowery words in long-winded descriptions, as if it were lifted right out of a novel. Few authors understand that the screenplay is written in a specific manner for budgeting and creative purposes, and obviously, for the screen. Here is a scene example that I’ll use to discuss the differences:

NOVEL

“Adrenaline pumped through David’s veins as his pace quickened toward the lone grave hidden beneath the canopy of large oak trees deep within the forest. His soiled gym shoes stopped in front of the fresh pile of dirt rounded over like a grave before rain settles the soil. David’s face aged 10 years in that moment and his legs weakened. He dropped to his knees with sorrowful eyes, knowing that he might be facing his daughter’s burial site. His hands looked like gnarled creature paws as he stroked away at the soil, digging deeper and faster with a weak hope of finding an animal in her place.

But he knew the truth. His hands would soon find his kidnapped daughter. He readied himself for the sight, as he plotted a new vision for revenge. His hand snagged a piece of material. The same as the dress his daughter wore at her seventh birthday party, the night she was kidnapped. David’s face flushed and turned stone cold. A fiery revenge welled within his soul forcing him to his feet. “I’m com’n for yah,” he groaned. With more energy than he thought possible, David bolted through the woods focused on his target.”

SCREENPLAY

EXT. FORREST – DAY
Exhausted, David scrambles through the forest. He stops at a fresh grave. Grimacing, David drops to his knees. He paws through the soil. David stops, hardens himself and glances off in the distance.

DAVID
I’m com’n for yah.

David runs from the grave, letting a streak of sunlight hit the floral cloth protruding from the soil.

PRODUCTION TOOL

The same overall action occurs in both depictions of the scene. The screenplay version is measured at 2/8 of a page, which tells the production manager how long the segment will take to film and how much it will cost. The word choices within the screenplay suggest the needed shot list to capture the story. The list includes:

  • XLS: David running in forest
  • MS: David panting as he runs
  • CU: David’s gym shoes stop at the grave
  • MS: David drops to his knees
  • MLS: David kneels at daughter’s grave
  • CU: David
  • CU: Hands digging
  • MS: David’s dialogue
  • LS: David running away from grave
  • XCU: Dress protruding from grave

With the scene being 2/8 of a page, the DP and 1st AD know they have to capture the full shot list in an hour to stay on budget. If, however, the scene were written like the novel, it would take 4-6/8 of a page and the team would allow 3-4 hours for the shoot. Unfortunately, the scene will still only take 15-20 seconds on screen, making the novel version far more costly to shoot—forcing the project over budget.

When properly written, a screenplay reveals the shooting schedule, budget, and camera shots.. It also hints at the character arcs and the emotional tonality the actor must consider when developing his character. There are also hints sewn into the script about the editorial pacing and tempo.

A person who knows how to read a professional screenplay can easily spot the above. But the novelist has no clue what information must be laced into the scene or how to concisely interweave it. Most don’t understand how this scene is likely to be shot handheld because of the story’s emotional turmoil and shooting schedule.

Beginning screenplay writers find themselves writing something halfway between the novel and professional screenplay, which inaccurately reflects the shoot requirements with information that cannot be seen on screen. A screenplay improperly written becomes a useless tool for the producer and production team. The better the screenplay writer, the more accurate the budget.

BOOKS ARE NOT FILMS

A second factor I face with authors is their misguided understanding of what makes for a good film versus a book. The original story allows the reader to get inside of the protagonist’s head, while the film can only show what happens, unless you like a lot of narration, which slows a film down and pulls the viewer out of the film story.

Books are about thought and films are about action. They are two different mediums and must be treated according to its own form. While most authors feel disgruntled about having their story altered to better fit the medium, they hate with a greater magnitude films that try to follow the book and end up destroying the story as a result.

The vast majority of great authors have to get used to seeing their “A” plotline become a “B” plotline in a movie, and their “B” plot become the “A” plotline. This inverted plotline structure makes for a far greater motion picture, and opens the story up to a wider audience than what the book was aimed at. Since movies cost a lot more than a book to create, this distinction is significant.

While there are additional factors that authors face when transitioning their work to the screen, I’ve run out of room to mention them in this post. The key is to understand that film and books are very different and require opposing skills to pull off. Flexibility is paramount for the author desiring a shot at the silver screen.

© 2018 by CJ Powers

Understanding the Visual Draw of Men

Understanding_VisualWe’ve all heard that men are visual. We’ve even heard that they are more visual than women. We’ve also been told that this difference is significant. So monumentally different, in fact, that women can’t quite understand what it’s like to live in a man’s visual world.

In a recent video hosted by Dennis Prager of Prager U, Dennis clarified some of the visual differences between a man and a woman. His examples were all related to sex, since this is one area more easily explained. However, the difference between a visual person and a literary-oriented person are far more reaching than the one life category of sex.

The Internet shifted from being a literary to a visual platform in 1994 with the first release of pictures and direct broadcast images. This expanded to far more homes in 2010-2014 with the introduction of broadband connections. Today there are hundreds of millions of visuals being consumed daily across the globe.

This increase in video-based Internet connections causes many women to believe they have become more visual. The great decline in the written word suggests there is something to the idea. But being visually versus literarily driven is not determined based on the amount of visuals consumed. It is established by how the visual impacts the individual.

I had the opportunity to observe a woman in her natural life setting as she interacted with the Internet, TV, and a book. She considered herself a visual person, as she explained during our conversation about visually driven men. She never understood how her thoughts of being visual were skewed by the fact that she was not actually visual.

When she read her book, I tried to converse with her, but nothing seemed to get through. Once I became overly rambunctious about chatting, she set the book to the side with extreme anger for me having interrupted her story. She was a literary-based person and I had interrupted her flow.

During a movie she watched on TV, I interrupted her often and she had no problem responding. She even took her eyes off the screen numerous times during our conversation. Pulling away from the visual medium took her little effort. In fact, she got up and walked into the kitchen several times without concern for having missed any visual information.

The Internet gave an interesting twist to my observations. When she was reading text, our interactions were just as adversarial as our book experience. But she had no qualms about being interrupted while watching videos online. The pause button was simple for her to push regardless of the visual story unfolding.

The woman who thought she was highly visual didn’t understand the drive that visuals have on men, nor the understanding that she was not consumed by the visuals. When we discussed it, she tried to point out how visual she was due to her inability to pull herself away during one part of the movie. I asked what was happening at the time and she mentioned her transfixiation with the dialogue—a literary, not visual element.

To help women understand men’s visualness, I’ll explain it using literary terms. Visuals are typically a man’s first language. Little boys do not chatter it up like little girls do, instead they keep a close eye on their toys and make sounds as they picture the dump truck backing into the construction zone filled with its load of gravel.

When I was at a Fortune 50 company a woman handed me a stack of reports to review before my afternoon meeting with our male executives. The pile was just shy of an inch thick. After reviewing the materials, I designed a one-sheet dashboard report with seven graphics.

I placed the thick report in front of each executive and handed them my one sheet. Within two minutes the action steps were decided and the executives asked if they had missed any key points from the report. I merely pointed out the woman’s name who worked diligently to produce the report and suggested they give kudos for her impressive and detailed efforts.

They agreed, got up, leaving the reports on the table, and took the dashboard report. The visual tool was a reference for our newest venture announcement minutes later, which was based on the report. The executives never read the report, but they referenced the visual dashboard report daily. Why? Because it gave the same information using their first language of visuals.

After my last speaking engagement, I was surrounded by business people wanting more information. One person noticed the notes for my keynote presentation and asked if he could take a picture of it. Within a few seconds men were lining up to do the same. For longer speeches, I use a sketchnote outline.

My notes are made up of a series of visuals depicting each portion or step of my speech. The pictures are directly correlated to my talk. I’d say it’s similar to an infographic that rapidly explains my entire talk with pictures. In fact, when these moments happen there is always one or two people who demonstrate their prowess by citing the part of my talk for each picture they see. They are amazed at how well the picture captures the talking point, which of course is why I do it.

I’m a visual person who has never been able to give a talk from a written outline. However, I found that longer talks are easily presented using a sketchnote outline. Why? Because I’m visual. Or, I can put it another way…I read, write, and speak visual first, English second.

So what language drives you…visual or literary?

© 2018 by CJ Powers